Poison Treatment and Toxicology Services

EMERGENCY?

Call 911 

or

Poison Help:

1-800-222-1222 

Hearing Impaired:

1-866-218-5372 

For non-emergencies only, call the Medication Safety and Exposure Clinic at Saint Francis

860-714-5155

The Medication Safety
and Exposure Clinic
at Saint Francis

114 Woodland Street
Hartford, Connecticut
06105

“In our modern society, we face threats from numerous hazardous substances. Prompt action by a trained specialist can be the critical factor in a successful outcome.”
Danyal Ibrahim, M.D.
Director and Section Chief,
Medical Toxicology Service at Saint Francis
 

Toxicity-Related Conditions

The Medication Safety and Exposure Clinic at Saint Francis provides help for a broad variety of toxicity-related conditions:

 

Poisoning

Poisoning emergencies are referred to Toxicology through the Emergency Department, and may result in inpatient care. Poisoning emergencies include:

  • Overdose of medication
  • Accidental swallowing of toxic substances such as cleaning products
  • Bites or stings from venomous living things such as snakes, spiders, and wasps
  • Swallowing of toxic living things such as poisonous plants and mushrooms
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Specific Complications from Medication

Non-emergency medicine complications are referred to Toxicology by physicians, and may, at the doctor's discretion, be treated through outpatient services. Specific complications from medication include:

  • Adverse reactions to medication
  • Taking too many different drugs (polypharmacy)
  • Harmful drug-to-drug interactions 
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Exposure to Toxic Substances

Non-emergency exposures to toxic substances are referred to Toxicology by physicians, and may, at the doctor's discretion, be treated through outpatient services. There are two kinds of toxic substance exposure:

  • Occupational - exposure to potentially harmful substances or agents due to one's occupation
  • Environmental - exposure to potentially harmful substances or agents in the environment or due to environmental factors
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